Burlesque

, It’s not about seducing men, it’s about embracing womanhood.‘‘ -Dita Von Teese

THE HISTORY OF BURLESQUE DANCING

“Burlesque has been a word used since the 17th century, deriving from the Italian word ‘burlesco’, itself from ‘burla’ meaning a joke or mockery. It was used to describe this type of theatre during the Victorian era.”

It used to describe a good-looking pastiche and an amazing parody in the 17th and 18th century.

Shows like these, called Burlesque, someone could’ve referred it to ‘travesty‘ and ‘extravaganza‘.

WHERE BURLESQUE BEGAN

Victorian burlesque was popular in London theatres from the 1830s to the 1890s. It took well-known culture like opera or Shakespeare and parodied it. They would often use the original music or popular music of the time and re-write the lyrics for comic effect. Venues became known for showing burlesque during this era.

INTERNATIONAL BURLESQUE

In London, burlesque shows were one of three acts in an evening’s entertainment up till the 1870s. Then they were extended to become the main event. Though by 1890 its popularity faded in favor of more wholesome entertainment. Meanwhile, in Paris, they had their own version of the chorus line with the famous can-can dance. Not to mention the amazing venues of the Folies Bergère and the Moulin Rouge.

NOWADAYS

It’s no surprise that shows like these stayed put until now due to their entertainment and likeability. Neo-burlesque has seen a worldwide revival with burlesque stars like Dita Von Teese, Miss Dirty Martini, Perle Noire, Julie Atlas Muz and Immodesty Blaize, to name a few.